The Global Centre on Healthcare and Urbanisation (GCHU) at Kellogg College seeks to make urban centres environmentally, economically, and socially sustainable, and to provide an environment that supports and sustains health and wellbeing.

Our interdisciplinary approach embraces sustainable urban development and evidence-based healthcare to undertake research, education and foster collaboration in these disciplines.

Latest news

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In our first Street Voice blog, researcher Dr Alison Chisholm details the recruitment of the jurors who will be answering questions about how people can travel where they need to in Oxford in a climate-friendly way that promotes health.

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GCHU Intern and MEng Engineering student Eleanor Cosford analyses the effects of embodied energy usage in construction on the environmental impact of buildings.

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GCHU Intern and BA Geography student Juan Garcia Valencia reviews the current experiment trends in urban sustainability.

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GCHU Reports: Preventable deaths

In these new reports, Joshua Loo and Jessica De La Haye (GCHU Research Analyst interns) and Dr Georgia Richards (GCHU Research Fellow) analysed Prevention of Future Death reports (PFDs) concerning deaths in Oxfordshire and Cambridgeshire.

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GCHU Public Seminars

The Centre hosts a series of seminars – open to the public – throughout the year. These lively discussions bring together a panel of speakers to address contemporary, and often controversial, issues in healthcare and urbanisation.

Commission on Creating Healthy Cities

The Commission on Creating Healthy Cities is run by the Global Centre on Healthcare & Urbanisation at Kellogg College, University of Oxford; the Prince’s Foundation is an active partner in the Centre and as such will co-host the Commission. The Commission will investigate the links between urban design and the risks and effects of infectious disease outbreaks and other serious threats to health and well-being, most immediately the Covid-19 crisis.